The Viral Storm: The Dawn of a New Pandemic Age

Dynamic young Stanford biologist Nathan Wolfe reveals the surprising origins of the world’s most deadly viruses, and how we can overcome catastrophic pandemics.

In The Viral Storm, award-winning biologist Nathan Wolfe tells the story of how viruses and human beings have evolved side by side through history; how deadly viruses like HIV, swine flu, and bird flu almost wiped us out in the past; and why modern life has made our species vulnerable to the threat of a global pandemic.

Wolfe’s research missions to the jungles of Africa and the rain forests of Borneo have earned him the nickname “the Indiana Jones of virus hunters,” and here Wolfe takes readers along on his groundbreaking and often dangerous research trips—to reveal the surprising origins of the most deadly diseases and to explain the role that viruses have played in human evolution.

In a world where each new outbreak seems worse than the one before, Wolfe points the way forward, as new technologies are brought to bear in the most remote areas of the world to neutralize these viruses and even harness their power for the good of humanity. His provocative vision of the future will change the way we think about viruses, and perhaps remove a potential threat to humanity’s survival.

Pandemic: Tracking Contagions, from Cholera to Ebola and Beyond

Scientists agree that a pathogen is likely to cause a global pandemic in the near future. But which one? And how?

Over the past fifty years, more than three hundred infectious diseases have either newly emerged or reemerged, appearing in territories where they’ve never been seen before. Ninety percent of epidemiologists expect that one of them will cause a deadly pandemic sometime in the next two generations. It could be Ebola, avian flu, a drug-resistant superbug, or something completely new. While we can’t know which pathogen will cause the next pandemic, by unraveling the story of how pathogens have caused pandemics in the past, we can make predictions about the future. In Pandemic: Tracking Contagions, from Cholera to Ebola and Beyond, the prizewinning journalist Sonia Shah―whose book on malaria, The Fever, was called a “tour-de-force history” (The New York Times) and “revelatory” (The New Republic)―interweaves history, original reportage, and personal narrative to explore the origins of contagions, drawing parallels between cholera, one of history’s most deadly and disruptive pandemic-causing pathogens, and the new diseases that stalk humankind today.

To reveal how a new pandemic might develop, Sonia Shah tracks each stage of cholera’s dramatic journey, from its emergence in the South Asian hinterlands as a harmless microbe to its rapid dispersal across the nineteenth-century world, all the way to its latest beachhead in Haiti. Along the way she reports on the pathogens now following in cholera’s footsteps, from the MRSA bacterium that besieges her own family to the never-before-seen killers coming out of China’s wet markets, the surgical wards of New Delhi, and the suburban backyards of the East Coast.

By delving into the convoluted science, strange politics, and checkered history of one of the world’s deadliest diseases, Pandemic reveals what the next global contagion might look like― and what we can do to prevent it.

Pandemics: What Everyone Needs to Know

Pandemics. The word conjures up images of horrific diseases sweeping the globe and killing everyone in their path. But such highly lethal illnesses almost never create pandemics. The reality is deadly serious but far more subtle.

In Pandemics: What Everyone Needs to Know®, Peter Doherty, who won the Nobel Prize for his work on how the immune system recognizes virus-infected cells, offers an essential guide to one of the truly life-or-death issues of our age. In concise, question-and-answer format, he explains the causes of pandemics, how they can be counteracted with vaccines and drugs, and how we can better prepare for them in the future. Doherty notes that the term “pandemic” refers not to a disease’s severity but to its ability to spread rapidly over a wide geographical area. Extremely lethal pathogens are usually quickly identified and confined. Nevertheless, the rise of high-speed transportation networks and the globalization of trade and travel have radically accelerated the spread of diseases. A traveler from Africa arrived in New York in 1999 carrying the West Nile virus; one mosquito bite later, it was loose in the ecosystem. Doherty explains how the main threat of a pandemic comes from respiratory viruses, such as influenza and SARS, which disseminate with incredible speed through air travel. The climate disruptions of global warming, rising population density, and growing antibiotic resistance all complicate efforts to control pandemics. But Doherty stresses that pandemics can be fought effectively. Often simple health practices, especially in hospitals, can help enormously. And research into the animal reservoirs of pathogens, from SARS in bats to HIV in chimpanzees, show promise for our prevention efforts.

Calm, clear, and authoritative, Peter Doherty’s Pandemics is one of the most critically important additions to the What Everyone Needs to Know® series.

SARS- and Other Coronaviruses: Laboratory Protocols

In 2003, the word “coronavirus” spread across the globe, somewhat further than the virus that sparked the panic. In SARS- and Other Coronaviruses: Laboratory Protocols, expert researchers examine these devastating viruses through detailed laboratory protocols. Chapters deal with such subjects as detection and discovery of coronaviruses by nucleic acid and antibody-based approaches, virus isolation, propagation and titration, virus purification, structure analysis by electron cryomicroscopy, expression and crystallization of viral proteins, raising antibodies against viral proteins, manipulation of the coronavirus genome, and descriptions of how to investigate aspects of the cell surface for coronavirus receptors. Composed in the highly successful Methods in Molecular Biology™ series format, each chapter contains a brief introduction, step-by-step methods, a list of necessary materials, and a Notes section which shares tips on troubleshooting and avoiding known pitfalls.

Comprehensive and cutting-edge, SARS- and Other Coronaviruses: Laboratory Protocols serves as an ideal guide for all virologists and especially for those working with coronaviruses.

5 Books Every Introvert Should Read

Quiet by Susan Cain

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking is a 2012 non-fiction book written by Susan Cain. Cain argues that modern Western culture misunderstands and undervalues the traits and capabilities of introverted people, leading to ‘a colossal waste of talent, energy, and happiness’.

At least one-third of the people we know are introverts. They are the ones who prefer listening to speaking; who innovate and create but dislike self-promotion; who favor working on their own over working in teams. It is to introverts—Rosa Parks, Chopin, Dr. Seuss, Steve Wozniak—that we owe many of the great contributions to society.

In Quiet, Susan Cain argues that we dramatically undervalue introverts and shows how much we lose in doing so. She charts the rise of the Extrovert Ideal throughout the twentieth century and explores how deeply it has come to permeate our culture. She also introduces us to successful introverts—from a witty, high-octane public speaker who recharges in solitude after his talks, to a record-breaking salesman who quietly taps into the power of questions. Passionately argued, superbly researched, and filled with indelible stories of real people, Quiet has the power to permanently change how we see introverts and, equally important, how they see themselves.


 

Introvert Power: Why Your Inner Life Is Your Hidden Strength by Laurie Helgoe

“If you have introvert inclinations and are doubting yourself, this is a must read. Or if you know someone who exhibits introvert symptoms, read this book before calling the shrink.” – Bhante Yogavacara Rahula, author of One Night’s Shelter: An Autobiography of an American Buddhist Monk EMBRACE THE POWER INSIDE YOU Are you an introvert? Psychologist and introvert Laurie Helgoe reveals that more than half of all Americans are. Introverts gain energy and power through reflection and solitude. Our culture, however, is geared toward the extrovert. The pressure to enjoy parties, chatter, and interactions can lead people to think that an inward orientation is a problem instead of an opportunity. Helgoe shows that the exact opposite is true: Introverts can capitalize on this inner source of power. INTROVERT POWER is a groundbreaking call for an introvert renaissance, a blueprint for how introverts can take full advantage of this hidden strength in daily life. Supplemented by the voices of several introverts, Helgoe presents a startling look at introvert numbers, influence, and economic might. Revolutionary and invaluable, INTROVERT POWER includes ideas for how introverts can learn to: Claim private space Carve out time to think Bring a slower tempo into daily life Create breaks in conversation and relationships Deal effectively with parties, interruptions, and crowds QUIET IS MIGHT. SOLITUDE IS STRENGTH. INTROVERSION IS POWER.


The Thriving Introvert by Thibaut Meurisse

Are you annoyed when people think you are aloof, shy, or snobby ? Are you tired of people telling you to get out more and behave more like an extrovert?
No, you don’t lack anything. No, you don’t need to be ‘fixed’. You are an introvert. And you’re full of amazing qualities that are greatly needed today.
As an introvert, you have a valid role to play, so stop trying so hard to be an extrovert.
This book is a wonderful invitation for you to embrace your introversion and grow comfortable in your own skin. It’s a call to live the life you were meant to live as an introvert, without guilt or shame.


The Introvert Advantage: How to Thrive in an Extrovert World by Marti Olsen Laney Psy.D.

At least one out of four people prefers to avoid the limelight, tends to listen more than they speak, feels alone in large groups, and requires lots of private time to restore their energy. They’re introverts, and here is the book to help them boost their confidence while learning strategies for successfully living in an extrovert world.After dispelling common myths about introverts-they’re not necessarily shy, aloof, or antisocial–The Introvert Advantage explains the real issues. Introverts are hardwired from birth to focus inward, so outside stimulation-chitchat, phone calls, parties, office meetings-can easily become “too much.”The Introvert Advantage dispels introverts’ belief that something is wrong with them and instead helps them recognize their inner strengths-their analytical skills, ability to think outside the box, and strong powers of concentration. It helps readers understand introversion and shows them how to determine where they fall on the introvert/extrovert continuum. It provides tools to improve relationships with partners, kids, colleagues, and friends, offering dozens of tips, including 10 ways to talk less and communicate more, 8 ways to showcase your abilities at work, how to take a child’s temperament temperature, and strategies for socializing. Finally, it shows how to not just survive, but thrive-how to take advantage of the introvert’s special qualities to create a life that’s just right for the introvert temperament, to discover new ways to expand their energy reserves, and even how, when necessary, to confidently become a temporary extrovert.


Introvert The Friendly Takeover by Linus Jonkman

Do you think before you speak, or speak before you think? Does it make you uncomfortable when sales clerks approach you, or is that just another reason why you enjoy shopping? Do you do your most creative work alone or in groups? These days being outgoing and flexible seem to be the most in-demand characteristics in the labor market. Social skills have come to be valued more than professional expertise, and the squeaky wheel tends to get the grease. We live in an age when reserved, thoughtful, and quiet characteristics have come to be classified as mental disorders, and introversion is often mistaken for shyness, arrogance, or antisocial behavior. However, these stereotypes stray far from the truth. Whether a particular person is an introvert or an extravert is a biologically hardwired aspect of his or her personality. Scientists have known of and studied this fact for more than a century, and new discoveries are still made in this field every day. Linus Jonkman takes his readers on a fascinating journey through the world of an introvert. He relates his own experiences of being an introvert as well as those of other people, and explains the differences and similarities between extraverts and introverts. Much of the friction we experience in our professional and private lives is caused by conflicts between these two basic orientations. Recently, our understanding of introversion has improved vastly, but we’re still waiting to see job listings specifically seeking people with introverted traits. In a world that keeps moving faster and faster, and where the noise get louder each passing day, introversion can actually be an advantage, and a blessing to those who possess it.Through personal anecdotes and barbed humor, Jonkman reveals the psychology of introverts, and shows us how they are often misunderstood by extraverts.


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